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Monastic orders and communities of the UGCC

 

Men’s monastic orders and communities

·         Basilian Order of Saint Josaphat (Basilians)

·         Monastery of the Studite Order (Studites)

·         Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (CSSR) (Redemptorists)

·         Society of the Salesian Fathers of Saint John Bosco (Salesians)

·         Monastery of Saint Theodore Studite

·         Community of Saint Andrew the Apostle

·         Community of the Incarnate Word

·         Community Soldier of Jesus (MJ) (Miles Jesu)

·         Franciscans   

 

Women’s monastic orders and communities

·         Sisters of the Order of Saint Basil the Great (OSBM) (Basilians)

·         Contemplative-Adoration Monastery of the Sisters of Saint Basil the Great of Saint Elias the Prophet

·         Congregation of the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate (SSMI) (Sister Servants)

·         Community of the Sisters of Saint Joseph the Betrothed of the Holy Virgin Mary (CSSJB) (Josephites)

·         Community of the Sisters of the Holy Family (CSHF) (Sisters of the Holy Family)

·         Community of the Sisters of Saint Josaphat Kuntsevych, Bishop and Martyr (CSJ) (Josephat Sisters)

·         Community of the Myrrh-bearing Sisters under the Protection of Saint Mary Magdalene (CSM)

·         Holy Protection Monastery of the Sisters of the Studite Order (Studites)

·         Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy of Saint Vincent (CSMV) (Vincentians)

·         Community of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

·         Community of the Sisters of the Holy Eucharist (CSHE) (Sisters of the Holy Eucharist)

·         Community of the Sisters Catechists of Saint Anne (CSCA) (Catechists)

·         Community of Salesians Sisters (CSS) Daughters of Mary Help of Christians (Salesians)

·         The youngest community –Missionary Sisters of the Most Holy Redeemer (CSR) (Redemptorists)

·         Community of Common Consecrated Life – Daughters of the Mother of God of Perpetual Help

·         Sisters of the Incarnate Word

 

Other communities:

·         Monastery of the Presentation of Holy Mary in the Temple

·         Miles Jesu

·         Missionaries of the Mercy of Jesus and Mary 

·         Missionaries of Charity

 

Men’s monastic orders and communities

At this time nine men’s orders and communities operate in Ukraine. They have a total of 675 members, including 62 novices and 77 candidates. In brief we will describe the most numerous of them.

 

Basilian Order of Saint Josaphat (Basilians)

The founder of the Basilian Order (OSBM) is Saint Basil the Great (4th century). His ascetic rules became a model for Theodosiy of the Caves, one of the first monks on Ukrainian territory. He founded many monasteries in Ukraine. At the beginning of the 17th century Metropolitan Veniamin Rutskyj joined separate monasteries. In addition he prepared rules for the monks which still remain the basis of life of the OSBM. This reform led to the unprecedented growth of the OSBM. During the period from the end of the 18th to the beginning of the 19th century the OSBM  suffered severe losses through its complete liquidation on the territory which as a result of the division of Poland passed to the Russian Empire and through the suppression of monasteries on the territory of the Austrian Empire. Starting in 1882, according to the order of Pope Leo XIII, the Jesuit Fathers conducted the reform of the OSBM. Monks raised under this reform became missionaries in Brazil, Canada, the USA, and Argentina. By 1949 the communist regime had liquidated all the European Basilian provinces (except for in Poland and Yugoslavia). Three hundred and fifty monks were sentenced to Siberia. Regardless of the severe losses, the OSBM operated actively in the underground period of the UGCC. Many new vocations appeared. At the same time the order continued to develop in Canada, the USA, Brazil and Argentina, in which there are presently 31 monasteries and approximately 250 monks. After the fall of the communist regime the provinces of the OSBM were revived in Ukraine, Romania, Hungary, and Slovakia. Today 30 monasteries and 37 residences operate in these countries. There are 354 members in Ukraine, of these 25 novices and 30 candidates.

Mission of the OSMB: pastoral work - in Ukraine it serves 62 parishes, more than 250 daughter churches, and nine mission stations in eastern Ukraine; publishing activity is the Missionary Publishing House in Lviv with a printing-house in Zhovkva and the publishing house Record of the Order of Saint Basil the Great in Rome; educational activity - in almost every province there is a house for educating young monks, a house of philosophical studies, and a minor seminary; Basilians are the rectors of the Pontifical College of Saint Josaphat in Rome and broadcast an educational radio program from the Vatican.

URL: www.osbm.in.ua

 

Monastery of the Studite Order (Studites)

The modern history of the Studite monks (MS) goes back to the beginning of the 20th century. It was founded by Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky in order to revive Eastern monasticism in the Church. The first renewed monastery of the Studite Order appeared in 1904 in Sknyliv, near Lviv. In 1906 Metropolitan Andrey as Archimandrite of the Studites finalized the typikon [liturgical rule] of the MS. During World War I many monks were subjected to repression. For those who survived Metropolitan Andrey gave his residence in Univ.

At the beginning of World War II in the various monasteries of Halychyna, the Lemko and Hutsul areas, there were 196 Studite monks. With the arrival of the communist government the monasteries were liquidated and most of the brothers were sentenced to Siberia. Only a small group of Studites managed to go to the West and found the Monastery of the Holy Dormition in Woodstock (Canada). After the liquidation of the Greek-Catholic Church the Studites continued to operate in the underground. Starting in 1963 Patriarch Joseph Slipyj took the Studites under his care. In 1973 Studite Fr. Lubomyr Husar, present Head of the Church, became Archimandrite of the Studites abroad.

Today in eight monasteries in Ukraine, Canada, and Italy there are 95 Studite monks. Two lavras [major monasteries] operate.  The mission of the MS is: the catechesis of children and youth - annually the Studite retreat house in Yaremche (the Carpathians) accepts 200 children from the area of Chernobyl; agricultural work - growing medicinal plants and beekeeping; educational work - at the monastery in Lviv the Svichado [Beacon] Publishing House of religious literature; also the Rozviy [Development] Workshop of church sacred arts operates.

The monastic day consists of eight hours of prayer, eight hours of work and eight hours of rest.

 

Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (CSSR) (Redemptorists)

The CSSR was founded by Saint Alphonsus Liguori in 1732. In 1906 the Belgian Redemptorist Fr. Achille Delaere, working among Ukrainians in Canada, began the Eastern branch of the CSSR. In 1913 thanks to the assistance of Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky the CSSR appeared in Ukraine. At the beginning the congregation had its province in Univ, and later in Zboishcha in Lviv. Then the CSSR appeared in Ternopil’, Stanislaviv, and Volyn’. The congregation spreads devotion to the Mother of God of Perpetual Help (MGPH). Stanislaviv [now Ivano-Frankivs’k] became the center of the brotherhood of the MGPH for faithful of the Eastern rite. In 1938 there were more than 200 brotherhoods with more than 100 000 members. At the beginning of World War II the CSSR had eight monastic houses in which more than 70 monks lived. In the years of the underground many fathers of the CSSR taught in the underground seminary. The CSSR developed in the diaspora. In Canada Ukrainian Redemptorists have six houses today, in the USA - 1. In them live thirty-five members of the CSSR, from which there are five bishops. With the exit of the UGCC from the underground the fathers of the CSSR began legal pastoral work. The largest center of work of the CSSR became Lviv (the monastery on Holosko). At the same time the CSSR opened houses in Ternopil’, Ivano-Frankivs’k, Kamyanec’-Podil’skyj, Novoyavorivs’k, and a mission station point in Prokopevs’k (Kemerovo region, Russia). Today there are 127 members in Ukraine, of these there are 21 candidates. Students of the congregation study in the Warsaw province of the CSSR.

The Lviv province of the CSSR has four blesseds: Bishop Mykolay Charnetskyj, Bishop Vasyliy Velychkovs’kyj, Fr. Zynoviy Kovalyk, and Fr. Ivan Zyatyk.

Mission of the CSSR: evangelization of the most needy, spiritual formation of priests, monks, nuns and laity, and work with youth. Searching for new ways to dialogue with modern youth. Summer program of the CSSR: young people work in missionary houses, soup kitchens, and have close contact with the very poor. The Mission of Saint Alphonsus (Canada): a Ukrainian Catholic community where secular young people live and conduct missionary work together with fathers of the CSSR.

 

Society of the Salesian Fathers of Saint John Bosco (Salesians)

The Salesian Community of the Eastern rite in Ukraine of the UGCC belongs to the world Salesian community, which is one of the largest religious communities of the Catholic Church. The Society of Salesians (SDB) was founded in 1859 in the city of Turin (Turino), by the Italian priest, great pedagogue and educator of children and youth, Saint John Bosco (Don Bosco 1815-1888), who also afterwards, together with Saint Maria D. Mazzarello (1837-1881), founded in 1872 the Salesian Sisters of St. John Bosco (Daughters of Mary Help of Christians).

The first Ukrainian Salesian was Fr. Kyrylo Seletskyj. In Halychyna [far western Ukraine] the society of the Salesians was publicized through his book “Father John Bosco - His life and activity” (published in 1900). At the beginning of the 1930s the bishop of Przemysl, Rev. Yosafat Kotsylovskyj, sent to the general curia of the society of the Salesians in Italy 30 students of the Przemysl seminary. In 1945 the first priest of those sent, Fr. S. Chmil’, was ordained. After the war the Salesians started their work among the Ukrainian diaspora in the countries of Western Europe. A minor seminary was created at first in France and then in Rome (1951-1996). The Ukrainian Salesians conducted especially active work in the areas of Argentina. The first bishop of Ukrainians in Argentina became the Salesian Andres Sapelak.

With the revival of the UGCC in Ukraine the Salesians began their work at the Church of the Protection of the Mother of God in Lviv, which before the war belonged to the Polish Salesians. Today it is one of the largest parishes in Lviv with more than 20 000 faithful. The parish operates near the canonically well-organized house of the Salesian society, unique in Ukraine, which has 16 members. The presence of a few such houses will allow the founding of a Ukrainian province of the society of the Salesians. For example, in Argentina, five such provinces exist.

Mission of the Salesians: the society of the Salesians consists of priests and laity. They live together in communities. Emphasis is given to work with youth, especially with those cast aside by society. At the Salesian Parish of the Protection of the Mother of God in Lviv operates the first Salesian oratory (a children and youth institution), where youth gather together for general prayer and leisure. During summer vacation the community of the Salesians organizes daily walks of children and young people to historical places and sites of natural beauty. Annually more than 400 people take part in such activities.

web: www.sdbua.net
www.sdb.org.ua

Monastery of Saint Theodore Studite

They number 44 members, including six novices and eight candidates.

This is a contemplative monastery. They pray the complete liturgical rule. They conduct pastoral work and catechesis, but only at the monasteries.

 

Community of Saint Andrew the Apostle

They have 14 members and 5 candidates. The purpose of the community is to prepare priests and brothers for missionary activity in the areas of eastern Ukraine and the countries of the former Soviet Union (especially on the territory of Siberia and Kazakhstan).

 

Community of the Incarnate Word

The religious family of the Incarnate Word was founded in Argentina on March 25, 1984, by Father Carlos Miguel Buela.

The general purpose is to imitate closely Christ under the action of the Holy Spirit so that, given the new status of His glory, working to build the Church and for the salvation of the world, they achieve excellence in love through the proclamation of the evangelical counsels of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

The specific purpose is the evangelization of culture, that is, the transformation by the power of the Gospel of the criteria of consideration, prominent values, points of interest, directing of thoughts, sources of inspiration, and models of life of humanity.

The community serves in 30 countries of the world on five continents, working in different rites (Latin, Byzantine, Coptic), and numbers more than 1400 members.

In July 2004, ten years had passed since the first priests of the Community of the Incarnate Word arrived in Ukraine. At the request of Bishop Andres Sapelak (SDB) missionaries came from Argentina to Ukraine (Lviv), where they lived and studied the Ukrainian language, helping at the Salesian Parish of the Protection of the Most Holy Mother of God. In 1995 at the invitation of Bishop Sofron Dmyterko, OSBM, the priests went to Ivano-Frankivs’k, where they began to found a monastic center. In September 1998 a novitiate was opened and in March 2004 a new monastic community in the village of Dubove, Transcarpathia Region, was opened. At present the institute is responsible for pastoral work in three parishes.

At present the men’s branch has 14 members: seven priests (five are Ukrainians and two Argentinians; also two priests are in Italy for studies), five seminarians and two candidates.

 

Community Soldier of Jesus – Miles Jesu (MJ)

In 1990 at the invitation of the administration of the UGCC member of MJ Tom Creen and Brother Steven Ryan came from the USA to Ukraine. In 1992 the first community of MJ was founded in the village of Bortnyky, in 1993 another in Lviv. In the two communities today live 13 members. Equal in rights members of MJ are married laity.

Mission of MJ: The appearance of the community is conditioned by a new understanding of the vocation of the laity in the Church, which developed in the constitution of the Second Vatican Council  “Lumen Gentium.” The priority for the MJ community is work with the laity: retreats are conducted mainly in apartments of the faithful. A “call” is a specific form of retreat which takes place over 10 days. During a “call” the members of the community live together with the those on retreat, engaged in charitable work and bring orphans and the homeless to this community.

 

Franciscans

The youngest men’s community in Ukraine has 21 members, including four novices and five candidates.

 

Women’s monastic orders and communities

Until 1945 there were in Ukraine eight women’s orders and communities. Today 18 women’s monastic communities are developing.

Brief information about the operating orders and communities follows.

 

Sisters of the Order of Saint Basil the Great (OSBM) (Basilians)

The history of the women’s branch of the OSBM reaches back to the 4th century. In 1037 Yaroslav the Wise built the first women’s monastery in Kyiv, in which nuns lived according to the rule of Saint Basil. After the reform of Metropolitan Rutskyj (in 1617) women’s monasteries became independent of each other. The sharp oppression of monastic life took place after the division of Poland. Of 25 woman’s monasteries (in 1772) there were none on the territory of Russia and only two on the territory of Austria. The reform of the Basilian Fathers, and afterwards the renewing of the chapter of the Basilian Sisters thanks to Metropolitan Andrey encouraged the development of woman’s monasteries. Houses of sisters of the OSBM have been founded in the USA, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Argentina, and Slovakia. In 1951 the Holy See centralized the order and gave it pontifical right. During the first years of the underground of the UGCC the order did not stop operating. In 1959 in underground monasteries of the OSBM appeared the first novices. The sisters helped underground priests in pastoral work.

Today the sisters of the OSBM are organized in seven provinces, three delegatures, three missions, and four contemplative monasteries. In Ukraine, Africa, America, Asia, Europe, and Oceania there are 660 sisters of the OSBM, of these in Ukraine there are 194 sisters, including 17 novices and six postulants.

Mission of the sisters of the OSBM: the sisters conduct catechesis of children, youth and adults at parishes and in schools; they work in charitable institutions: orphanages and hospitals; carry on educational activity - work in the media, publishing houses, and printing-houses.

 

Contemplative-Adoration Monastery of the Sisters of Saint Basil the Great of Saint Elias the Prophet

So that the traditions of Saint Basil the Great and Eastern monasticism would be better maintained, in 1925 a contemplative-adoration monastery began to operate in Ukraine.

This type of monastic life involves daily carrying out the Church rule in obedience to liturgical instructions, adoration of the blessed sacrament, and the contemplation of divine matters. Additional time is dedicated to manual and other labor (taking care of gardens and artistic work) or study, in particular religious subjects. In the monastery the sisters bring before the throne of the Most High prayers for our Church, for the Ukrainian people, for peace in the whole world, for the conversion of sinners, for God’s help for missions and for all those who spread the divine word among the people. The community has 43 members, including 15 novices and four candidates.

 

Congregation of the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate (SSMI) (Sister Servants)

The SSMI was founded in 1892 in Halychyna [far western Ukraine] as the first active apostolic community of nuns in the Eastern rite. The reason was the special spiritual impoverishment of the Ukrainian village. The first house was formed in the village of Zhuzhel’ at the initiative of Fr. Yeremiah Lomnytskyj, OSBM, local pastor Fr. Kyryl Seletskyj, and Sr. Mykhaylyna Hordashevska, the first mother superior of the monastery (on taking monastic vows, she accepted the name Josaphata). In the villages where the SSMI came, preschool educational institutions were opened; patients received care, and girls and women joined religious organizations. People loved very much the glad and tireless sisters of the community. For 10 years from the moment of foundation more than 100 sisters lived in 20 houses. In 1930 the SSMI received pontifical rights. From the moment of the liquidation of the UGCC it operated actively in the underground. The SSMI developed missions to Canada, Yugoslavia, Brazil, Czechoslovakia, Italy, Poland, France, Argentina, and Australia.

Today 25 communities of the SSMI operate in Ukraine (Halychyna, eastern Ukraine, Transcarpathia), where 160 members live, including 15 novices and one candidate. 

Mission of the SSMI: at present a great need in Ukraine is the Christian education of children, young people, and older people who in the time of communism had no possibility to get to know God. Therefore the sisters are most involved in missionary and catechetical work: 

•           They organize and conduct summer catechetical courses.

•           publish catechetical textbooks,

•           conduct retreats for youth,

•           organize summer camps and pilgrimages,

•           and conduct educational work at secondary schools. 

They have also created catechetical centers. In addition, they care for the beauty of God’s churches, sew clerical vestments, and work with the ill, treating them with folk medicine.

 

Community of the Sisters of Saint Joseph the Betrothed of the Most Holy Virgin Mary (CSSJB) (Josephites)

The CSSJB was founded in 1898 by Fr. Kyryl Seletskyj. The young women who formed the first house in the village of Tsebliv intended to enter the community of Sisters Servants in the village of Zhuzhel’. But they were not accepted there. Thus, Fr. Kyryl Seletskyj took care of them. The young women gathered to pray together and treated the sick. In 1906 Fr. Seletskyj bought a lot and a building for the sisters and for orphan children. The official name of the community was the Society of Saint Joseph the Betrothed. The sisters performed binding work, wove carpets, knitted and embroidered. From 1921 the Redemptorist Fathers under the spiritual leadership of Przemysl Bishop Yosafat Kotsylovskyj took care of the sisters. In connection with the internal policy of interwar Poland in 1937, the society ceased activity but its members formed a monastic community. In these times on the territory of the Przemysl Eparchy 180 sisters lived in 30 monasteries. The CSSJB suffered persecution with the liquidation of the UGCC, but did not stop operating. Today the main house of the CSSJB is located in Krakow (Poland). In Ukraine 52 sisters live in 11 houses, with four novices; in Poland 16 sisters in five houses, in Canada 14 sisters in two houses, and in Brazil 20 sisters in four houses.

Mission of the CSSJB: it organizes and takes care of orphanages, serves in government work, in particular in hospitals and other places where the weak and the very needy are found, and runs a home for old people (Saskatoon, Canada).

 

Community of the Sisters of the Holy Family (CSHF) (Sisters of the Holy Family)

The co-founders of the CSHF are Fr. Dykyj and Fr. Teklya Yuzefiv from the village of Novy Martyniv (Ivano-Frankivs’k Region). A young woman was staying with the Community of the Sisters of Saint Joseph the Betrothed in the village of Tsebriv. But because she was sick she had to leave this monastery. Father Dykyj founded in Zhovkva a community with an easier rule. In 1912 the monastery was moved to the village of Hoshiv (Ivano-Frankivs’k Region). At the time of the liquidation of the UGCC in 1946, there were 78 sisters in 20 houses of the Lviv, Stanislaviv and Przemysl eparchies. In the underground the sisters were engaged in preparing children for first Communion. They worked actively in the period of the legalization of the UGCC.

Today 85 sisters work in the Lviv, Ivano-Frankivs’k and Ternopil’ eparchies, including three novices and two candidates. Sisters of the CSHF also live in Italy and Canada. 

Mission of the CSHF: catechesis of children and youth; work in shelters, orphanages, and schools. The sisters are active in missions in eastern Ukraine (Chernobyl, Sumy, Kherson), in Transcarpathia, and among the Ukrainian diaspora on the territory of the former Soviet Union (Estonia, Kazakhstan, Russia).

 

Community of the Sisters of Saint Josaphat Kuntsevych, Bishop and Martyr (CSJ) (Josephat Sisters)

The CSJ was founded in the second half of the 18th century in Pidlyashshya [in northwestern Ukraine and northeastern Poland], in the village of Bila, where relics of Saint Josaphat Kuntsevych were preserved. The founders of the CSJ were Fr. Timotey and Palaheya-Katrina Bril’. The task of the community was to preserve the relics of the martyr St. Josaphat. The community was considered the third OSBM. In 1873 Russia liquidated the community in Pidlyashshya and the Chelm region. In 1912 the community renewed their work at the initiative of Maria Zavaliy and her sister Anna. The same year in the village of Kizlov, Bus’k District, the first novitiate of the community was opened. The CSJ retained the land and the shelter (village of Bus’k).

Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky personally took care of the Josaphat Sisters. In the years of the UGCC underground the community catechized children and helped underground priests in their pastoral work. The Josaphat Sisters were especially active during the legalization of the UGCC. They worked in schools, parishes, traveled on missions, especially in eastern Ukraine, and prepared youth for Christian married life.

Today in the three houses of the CSJ in Ukraine 16 sisters live. 

Mission of the order: to work to strengthen the Catholic spirit among the Ukrainian people; to teach girls and women the Catholic faith, and to spread the Catholic press. The Josaphat Sisters now mainly are involved in the catechism of children and youth in schools and parishes.

 

Community of the Myrrh-bearing Sisters under the Protection of Saint Mary Magdalene (CSM)

The CSM was founded in 1910 in Krystynopol (Lviv Region) by Fr. Julian Datsiy, OSBM. The purpose of the community was to collect money for building a house for orphans, the poor, and lonely people. The first members of the community gave their wedding dowries for the construction of two houses: one for the people, the second for themselves. In 1913 the first monastery, in which 15 sisters lived, appeared. In 1928 Stanislaviv Bishop Hryhoriy Khomyshyn invited the community to Stanislaviv. The sisters led a contemplative life. In 1939 the CSM was dispersed. In the underground most of the sisters began to work in hospitals. With their incomes they sent parcels to priests in Siberia. Not a single sister during the underground left the community; it even spread. After the exit of the UGCC from the underground, the community actively took part in the renewal of the Church. The community has 50 sisters, including eight novices. Houses are in Ivano-Frankivs’k, Bohorodchany and Kolomyja.

The mission: to care for the sick and weak, orphan children, to educate children in a Christian spirit, care of churches, and adoration of the Holy Eucharist. The community is missionary and contemplative.

 

Holy Protection Monastery of the Sisters of the Studite Order (Studites)

Studite woman’s monasticism was reborn in Ukraine in 1924 at the initiative of Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky. The first monastery appeared in the village of Yaktoriv. The sisters were involved in farming and beekeeping, braided baskets, and worked in orphanages, pre-schools and schools. They edited the magazine “Yasna put’” [Clear path]. The basis of life of the Studite monasteries is unceasing prayer. In 1950 all the Studite monasteries were liquidated (except in Przemysl, Poland). During the times of the UGCC underground 17 nuns entered the monastery. 

Today there are 56 sisters in the monastery, including four novices and one candidate. 

Mission: work in hospitals, orphanages, embroidering vestments, catechesis, and study. The ordering of life in the monastery: eight hours of prayers, the complete church rule, eight hours of work, eight hours for rest.

 

Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy of Saint Vincent (CSMV) (Vincentians)

The CSMV was founded in Ukraine by Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky in 1926 after visits of the community of the CSMV in Belgium. The first sisters lived in Stanislav, taking care of an orphanage. In the 1930s the sisters took care of the patients in the National Hospital in Lviv, which was founded by Metropolitan Andrey. In 1939, one hundred and twenty-four children from the orphanage of the CSMV were taken to Siberia. The monasteries were liquidated. Metropolitan Andrey provided shelter for the sisters in the metropolitan chambers. The sisters took care of Metropolitan Andrey up to his death in 1944. During the underground the sisters continued to work in hospitals, performing pastoral work there.

Today in the houses of Lviv and Ternopil’ live 64 sisters, including two novices and one candidate. The spiritual direction of the community is carried out by the Redemptorist Fathers.

Mission of the community: to help the unfortunate, the most needy both physically and spiritually. The sisters work in Metropolitan A. Sheptytsky National Hospital in Lviv, in orphanages in Lviv and Ternopil’ and, in cooperation with the Red Cross of the city of Viareggio (Italy), take care of orphan children from the Chernobyl area.

 

Community of the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

It was founded in the Ivano-Frankivs’k Region during the war, in 1945. The purpose of the founding and activity is to unite sisters under the protection of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in order to imitate the Most Holy Virgin Mary by their internal life and external activity. The contemplative life is the basic obligation of the community. As the external conditions and necessities of the Church require it, the sisters help the holy Church in apostleship, pastoral ministry, and teaching. Today in the houses of the community live 31 sisters, including two candidates.

 

Community of the Sisters of the Holy Eucharist (CSHE) (Sisters of the Holy Eucharist)

The CSHE was founded in 1957 by Rev. Bishop Mykolay Charnetskyj after his return from imprisonment. The CSHE worked in the Lviv, Ivano-Frankivs’k and Transcarpathia regions. At the beginning the community numbered 40 sisters. They worked at government work, on collective farms, and also prepared children for the Holy Eucharist and adults for the sacrament of baptism. They gathered people for divine services. After the exit of the Church from the underground, His Beatitude Myroslav blessed the community’s development. Today the CSHE in Ukraine numbers 27 sisters.

Mission of the CSHE: The sisters work in church offices, catechize children, and teach Christian ethics and foreign languages.

 

Community of the Sisters Catechists of Saint Anne (CSCA) (Catechists)

The CSCA was founded by Fr. Omelyan Yosafat Ananevych in Brazil in 1932. Its initial name was the Community of Sisters Catechists Franciscans of the Third Order. The purpose was the Christian education of Ukrainian settlers in Brazil. Since 1962 the Basilian Fathers have provided spiritual direction for the community. The CSCA has served in Ukraine since 1991.

In Brazil, the U.S., Italy, and Ukraine 18 houses operate, in which live 103 sisters, including 13 sisters in two houses in Ukraine.

Mission of the CSCA: Catechesis of children, youth and adults, in parishes, schools, hospitals, special camps; organization of the Society of the Apostleship of Prayer, Mary’s Company, eucharist knights; work in hospitals, orphanages, old people’s homes; they maintain order in churches and take care of vestments.

 

Community of Salesian Sisters (CSS) Daughters of Mary Help of Christians (Salesians)

The CSS was founded in 1872 by Saint John Bosco and Saint Maria Mazzarello in the north of Italy. They have been in Ukraine since August 1992. The mission mainly works at the Church of the Protection of the Most Holy Mother of God in the city of Lviv. 

Mission of the CSS: to foster joyful Christian service, ecumenical cooperation, catechesis of children and youth in preschools, schools, special camps, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and through foreign language lessons. There are 10 members, including three candidates.

 

The youngest community – Missionary Sisters of the Most Holy Redeemer (CSR) (Redemptorists)

The community lives and serves according to the spirituality of Saint Alphonsus Liguori and Saint Teresa of the Child Jesus, patron of missions. 

The history of the Redemptorist Missionary Sisters began in post-war Germany, when priests of the Redemptorist Order of the Munich Province felt the need for the help of sisters in missionary work. From the beginning there was talk about the creation of a community, the structure and aims of which would correspond to the community of Redemptorists, with the community life and monastic vows. On October 3, 1957, in Gars on Inn was begun the first novitiate of five sisters. This day is considered the foundation day of the community of the Missionary Sisters of the Most Holy Redeemer. Together with work in some houses and institutions of the Redemptorists, the sisters also began to execute at first pastoral tasks and, from 1965, missionary activity together with the Redemptorists.

History in Ukraine:

In 1997 a few young Ukrainian girls, raised in a parish which was led by the Redemptorist Fathers, appealed to the proto-ihumen of the Lviv Province of Redemptorists. Inspired by the spirituality of Saint Alphonsus and the method of pastoral and missionary activity of the Redemptorists, the girls expressed the desire to devote their life to God in the spirit of the charism of the Redemptorists. At the invitation of the Redemptorists on July 12, 1997, the general mother superior of the Redemptorists in Germany, Sister Veronica Ajmer, CSR, came to Ukraine. The sisters from Germany offered to take care of the spiritual formation of future Ukrainian Redemptorist Missionaries. On April 27, 1998, five girls started community life in Lviv. Afterward others joined them. While the German sisters prepared for the consideration of the general chapter the question of the formation of Ukrainian sisters in the Eastern rite, the Redemptorist Fathers took care spiritually and materially of the candidates. In January 2000 at the general chapter of the sisters a positive answer was given to the query of the Redemptorist Fathers about the formation of sisters in Ukraine and two sisters were appointed: Sr. Margret Obereder and Sr. Hildegard Dankel. In two years another German, Sister Paola Schtraub, joined them. On April 27, 2001, the official transfer of the sisters from Germany took place and on June 3, 2001, the first novitiate of Ukrainian sisters began.

Today the sisters are involved in service in parishes, work with young people and children, travel to villages to catechize children, organize Christian summer camps, pilgrimages, and conduct youth retreats. In their work they give special attention, in accord with methods of the proclamation of the Good News, to the age-specific and social categories of the people whom they serve. As much as possible they try to give attention and love to people in most need and abandoned on the margins of society.

The Redemptorist Sisters closely co-operate in pastoral and missionary activity with the Redemptorist Fathers. Redemptorist Sisters today in Ukraine: Ukrainians – 18, foreigners who work in Ukraine – 3, with temporary vows - 11, with perpetual vows – 3, in novitiate – 3, in candidacy – 4. The whole community in different countries of the world (Germany, Austria, Chile, Bolivia, Ukraine, Japan) numbers 110 sisters.

 

Community of Common Consecrated Life – Daughters of the Mother of God of Perpetual Help

The apostolic activity of the sisters is directed at work with families and youth, in particular: 

•  to work with families: visiting houses, helping to resolve financial, spiritual and moral problems; 

•  to catechize young married couples and also prepare them for marriage; 

•  to work with youth: organize general meetings, groups of young people at parishes.

Prospects and plans for the future: 

•  to create Bible groups; 

•  to organize retreats for families; 

•  to run centers of spiritual, psychological and financial support for single mothers and women who have suffered violence and are expecting children, intend to end their pregnancies or suffer from post-abortion syndrome;

•  to help women who have difficulties with the birth of a child in the family; 

•  to run shelters for needy single mothers. 

Mother superior of the community –Sr. Mikhaila Dovhun'. There are five sisters, the average age of which is 27 years.

 

Sisters of the Incarnate Word

The religious family of the Incarnate Word was founded in Argentina on March 25, 1984, by Father Carlos Miguel Buela. Four years later, on March 19, 1988, the men’s branch of the community was founded.

The general purpose is to imitate closely Christ under the action of the Holy Spirit that, given in the new status of His glory, working to build the Church and for the salvation of the world, to achieve excellence in love through the proclamation of the evangelical counsels of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

The specific purpose is the evangelization of culture, that is, the transformation by the power of the Gospel of the criteria of consideration, prominent values, points of interest, directing of thoughts, sources of inspiration, and models of life of humanity.

 The community serves in 30 countries of the world on five continents, working in different rites (Latin, Byzantine, Coptic), and numbers more than 1400 members.

In January 1999 the first community of Sisters Servants of the Lord and the Virgin from Matar was founded in Ukraine. When the sisters arrived in Ukraine, there were already here girls who wanted to live the consecrated life in obedience to the charism of the Incarnate Word, which they came to know through the work of the fathers of the community. Almost at once a novitiate was founded in the city of Ivano-Frankivs’k. Over eight years more than 40 sisters were formed in this house.

The most important directions of the work to the present are: work with vocations in the community of the novitiate, work with children in schools and works of mercy, as a result of which was the creation in autumn 2004 of Saint Nicholas Mercy Town. In September 2004 the community of sisters and aspirants (girls of school age who at an early age sensed their vocation and are preparing to become nuns) departed to work in the village of Dubove, Transcarpathia Region. At this time the women’s branch numbers 42 members, including two novices, four candidates and two aspirants. Five sisters work outside of Ukraine (three in Russia, one in Tajikistan, one in Italy).

 

Other communities:

Monastery of the Presentation of Holy Mary in the Temple (37 nuns)

Miles Jesu (8 members)

Missionaries of the Mercy of Jesus and Mary  (15 members)

Missionaries of Charity (19 members)


Church in action


 

 


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